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10 courses found.
LAW (W76)  (Dept. Info)Law  (Policies)SP2018

W76 LAW 646SReorganization Seminar (Keating/Going/Palans/Schermer)3.0 Units
Description:Enrollment limit: 16. Drop deadline: 5:00 p.m. the day after the first class meeting. This course will be taught jointly by Professor Keating, United States Bankruptcy Judge Barry Schermer and David Going of Armstrong Teasdale. Lloyd Palans of Bryan Cave serves as the designated substitute teacher for the course. The primary focus of the class will be reorganizations under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. Using a single hypothetical reorganization as a backdrop, the instructors will take students through the various stages of a Chapter 11 case, from the initial filing with the bankruptcy court to confirmation of a plan of reorganization. The class will meet once each week during the semester for 90 minutes each session. The pedagogical objectives of the class include improving the students' persuasive writing, their knowledge of Chapter 11 bankruptcy law, and their ability to think on their feet. Attendance and preparation are both required. Students who have not taken the basic Bankruptcy course may enroll, but they may be at a disadvantage to those students who have. No laptops will be allowed during this seminar. Students' grades will be determined by their performance on two 8-page written assignments (both of which will require a re-write by the students after receiving written feedback from the instructors) and by their participation in class discussion. 3 units.
Attributes:LawCOIFGR, LCU, SEM
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M------7:38A-9:00AAB Law Bldg / 201 David Going, Lloyd Palan, Daniel Keating, Hon. Barry SchermerSee Department0157
LawStart: 1/16/2018   End: 5/4/2018

W76 LAW 737SWar Crimes & Tribunals Seminar (Sadat)3.0 Units

W76 LAW 771SInternational Taxation Seminar (Rosenzweig)3.0 Units

W76 LAW 790SAdvanced Topics in Foreign Relations Law Seminar (Waters)3.0 Units
Description:Enrollment limit: 16. Drop deadline: 5:00pm the day after the first class meeting. In this writing seminar, each student will explore a contemporary legal problem in foreign relations law. Over the course of the semester, students will prepare and revise a paper, comparable in scope and quality to a law review note, of no more than 30 pages. Students will choose paper topics at the beginning of the semester, with the help and guidance of the instructor. With instructor approval, students may write on any topic in foreign relations law. General areas of potential research include, but are not limited to, the distribution of foreign affairs powers between the President and Congress, legal issues surrounding the "war on terror," the role of courts in adjudicating foreign affairs cases, treatment of "enemy combatants" and other detainees, the incorporation of international treaty law and customary international law into U.S. law, the role of the 50 states in foreign affairs law, the relationship between the federal and state governments in foreign affairs, and the extraterritorial application of the U.S. Constitution and of U.S. laws overseas. Students must obtain instructor approval of their paper topics before beginning work. Each paper will progress from topic selection to a detailed written outline, to at least two drafts of no more than 30 pages each. We will meet formally as a group at the start of the semester, and will reconvene later in the semester as the need arises. Students will also have mandatory meetings with the instructor over the course of the semester. Students will receive significant individualized feedback after completion of the first draft. There are no formal prerequisites for this course, but students who have not taken a course in foreign relations law or international law may need to do some additional work at the beginning of the semester to familiarize themselves with basic concepts. Grades will be based on a weighted average of the first and final drafts, with heavy point penalties for unexcused missed deadlines. (This seminar is not graded anonymously because the professor works with students on their papers throughout the semester.) 3 units.
Attributes:LawCOIFGR, LCU, SEM
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History

W76 LAW 813SDigital Civil Liberties Seminar3.0 Units

W76 LAW 827SImplicit Bias, Law & the Legal Profession Seminar3.0 Units
Description:Enrollment limit: 16. Drop deadline: 5:00pm the day after the first class meeting. This seminar will focus on implicit biases-what they are, where they exist, who has them, why, and what, if anything, can or should be done about them. We will focus, in particular, on race, color, ethnicity, gender, gender expression and gender identity, disability, and age. We will look at how these biases manifest in society, in individual lives and ultimately in decision making. Decision making results in policies, rules, laws that can be very discriminatory or preferential to some groups over others. We will discuss how does this look in law and in the legal profession and what can or should lawyers (and Judges) do about conscious decision making that results in unconscious harm. We will discuss strategies and tools that can be used by those in the legal profession as we strive to create a more just society. The seminar will meet weekly for a portion of the semester. Attendance and class participation are required. Classes cannot be recorded without prior professor approval. A break in class meeting periods will occur to allow students time to work research papers. Students must write papers on some type of implicit bias--you are not limited to the areas we will focus on during the semester-and explore whether the law and/or the legal profession should respond. Topics must be cleared with the professor. A draft of the student's research is required and a final work product, not to exceed 30 pages is required. Students will present their research to the class towards semester's end. The final grade will include : attendance, class participation, student draft, the presentation of the work product and the final paper. 3 units.
Attributes:LawCOIFGR, LCU, SEM
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History

W76 LAW 834SInnovation in Pharmaceutical Technologies Seminar3.0 Units
Description:Enrollment: 16. Drop deadline: 5:00pm the day after the first class meeting. This seminar will consider the ways in which different areas of law contribute to the broader innovation ecosystem surrounding pharmaceutical technologies, examining the relationships between legal doctrines and innovation incentives. The first section of the course will consider different innovation policy levers, beginning with a focus on traditional levers like intellectual property and expanding to consider understudied incentive levers including grants, prize systems, and health insurance coverage. The second section will engage in an intersystemic analysis of these innovation policy levers, exploring their interactions and their relationship to the relevant legal institutional actors. The third section will confront a series of case studies, chosen to demonstrate the power and potential of this broad view of innovation policy. Readings will include scholarly articles from the legal literature, cases, and other materials. Two-thirds of the course grade will be based on written work: three seven-to-eight-page response papers, spread evenly throughout the course. One-third will be based on class participation. Feedback will be provided on each response paper before the next is due, but no rewrites will be required. Previous coursework in the area, such as the Intellectual Property Survey, Patent Law, or Health Law is strongly preferred, but not required - prior work or graduate school experience in the area is sufficient preparation for many.
Attributes:LawCOIFGR, LCU, SEM
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History

W76 LAW 841SComparative Constitutional Law Seminar2.0 Units
Description:Enrollment limit: 16. Drop deadline: 5:00pm the day after the first class meeting. The course will cover a series of topics arising in the comparative study of constitutional systems. In many countries in the world, constitutional law has become a booming, ambitious, politically alive field, through which courts with constitutional jurisdiction have become aggressive players in new forms of politics. We are witnessing (as various authors call it) "the rise of world constitutionalism," "the inevitable globalization of constitutional law," "migration of constitutional ideas," "constitutional engagement in a transnational era," "global expansion of judicial power," "governing with judges," or simply the creation of "courtocracies". We will concentrate on the study and comparison of the constitutional law of the United States, Israel and other countries such as Canada and Germany. In the first part of the course, we will introduce and analyze basic questions of comparative constitutional law (CCL): What is CCL? Why to study it? Critiques of CCL? What is constitution and constitutionalism and the role of courts in the field? Substantial discussion will be devoted to the varying foundations and structures of judicial review of the constitutionality of law, e.g., how are courts that engage in constitutional review structured, how are their judges appointed, what is the source of their authority to engage in constitutional review. In the second part, we will examine and compare several case studies on constitutional protection of human rights, including: freedom of religion, freedom of speech, abortion, and equality and group rights. The third part of the course will explore recent trends in the field, especially the globalization and internationalization of constitutionalism, and conclude some conclusions about comparative constitutional law, the role of courts in constitutionalism, with some emphasis on the Unites States and the Israeli Supreme Courts. Through all critical discussions during this course we will try to reach some insights and conclusions on two main themes: First, the role of comparative study of constitutions and constitutionalism. Second, the role of courts in democracy. Regular class attendance and preparation are required. All students will be required to submit a research paper for assessment. Students are expected to read all assigned materials and be prepared for all classes. ABA Standard 310 requires "not less than one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and two hours of out-of-class student work per week or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time" for each credit hour awarded. This course is designed to meet this requirement, and each student is expected to spend on average no less than two hours of out-of-class time for each one hour of in-class time, per credit hour. 2 units.
Attributes:LawCOIFGR, LCU, SEM
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
Label

Home/Ident

A course may be either a “Home” course or an “Ident” course.

A “Home” course is a course that is created, maintained and “owned” by one academic department (aka the “Home” department). The “Home” department is primarily responsible for the decision making and logistical support for the course and instructor.

An “Ident” course is the exact same course as the “Home” (i.e. same instructor, same class time, etc), but is simply being offered to students through another department for purposes of registering under a different department and course number.

Students should, whenever possible, register for their courses under the department number toward which they intend to count the course. For example, an AFAS major should register for the course "Africa: Peoples and Cultures" under its Ident number, L90 306B, whereas an Anthropology major should register for the same course under its Home number, L48 306B.

Grade Options
C=Credit (letter grade)
P=Pass/Fail
A=Audit
U=Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
S=Special Audit
Q=ME Q (Medical School)

Please note: not all grade options assigned to a course are available to all students, based on prime school and/or division. Please contact the student support services area in your school or program with questions.