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33 courses found.
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (L82)  (Dept. Info)Arts & Sciences  (Policies)FL2024

L82 EnSt 101Earth's Future: Causes and Consequences of Global Climate Change3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---1:00P-2:20PTBAWysession, KidderNo final8050
Actions:Books
A--W----3:00P-3:50PTBATBADefault - none1620
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.
Actions:Books
B--W----4:00P-4:50PTBATBADefault - none1600
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.
Actions:Books
C---R---4:00P-4:50PTBATBADefault - none1610
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.
Actions:Books
D---R---4:00P-4:50PTBATBADefault - none1610
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.
Actions:Books
E----F--1:00P-1:50PTBATBADefault - none1610
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.
Actions:Books

L82 EnSt 102To Sustainability and Beyond: People, Planet, Prosperity3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----11:30A-12:50PTBATrivers, VanRiperPaper/Project/TakeHome7570
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first-year students will be unenrolled from this course.
Actions:Books

L82 EnSt 110Environmental Issues3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----3:00P-4:50PTBAParksDec 12 2024 6:00PM - 8:00PM30100
Desc:Sections 01 and 03 will meet in the same classroom.
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.
02-T-R---10:00A-11:20ATBAParksDec 17 2024 6:00PM - 8:00PM30180
Desc:Sections 02 and 04 will meet in the same classroom.
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.
03M-W----3:00P-4:50PTBAParksDec 12 2024 6:00PM - 8:00PM3000
Desc:Section reserved for First-Year Students ONLY. Upper-level students wiil be dropped from this section. Sections 01 and 03 will meet in the same classroom.
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.
04-T-R---10:00A-11:20ATBAParksDec 17 2024 6:00PM - 8:00PM3010
Desc:Section reserved for First-Year Students ONLY. Upper-level students will be dropped from this section. Sections 02 and 04 will meet in the same classroom.
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.

L82 EnSt 215Introduction to Environmental Humanities3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---8:30A-9:50ATBALouiNo final1210
Desc:Section 01 reserved for First-Year students ONLY.
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.
02-T-R---1:00P-2:20PTBALouiNo final12120
Desc:Section 02 reserved for second-year students only.
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.

L82 EnSt 2950Introduction to Environmental Biology3.0 Units
Description:Introduction to Environmental Biology is designed to teach important principles of environmental biology and general science literacy skills. The course is threaded around a central organizing question: how can we feed a growing and more urbanized human population and conserve biodiversity without destroying the planet? We focus on the foundational biological principles involved in four main topics in the context of some contentious and confusing issues related to environmental biology in everyday life: human population growth, biological fluxes of carbon and energy in the ecosystem, biodiversity and conservation, and sustainable agriculture. The science literacy skills that are covered in this course help students face scientific and pseudoscientific claims about the environment and society in everyday life and will form the foundation for your development as a critical consumer of science information in the media. This course is taught in an active learning format utilizing reading homework before class to learn content and a mix of active student discussion and short lectures during class. Grades are based on homework, unit quizzes, and scientific literacy projects. This is an introductory course designed for first and second year students, though students of all years have found the course impactful and meaningful. Students will be manually assigned to a section by the instructor after add/drop is over; sections allow assignment into groups with dedicated TAs, but all section-based work happens during the main course time slot.
Attributes:A&S IQNSMArchNSMArtNSMBUSCI
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L41 2950Frequency:Annually / History

L82 EnSt 310Ecological Economics3.0 Units
Description:Our planet is finite but our economic theories and practices assume that our economy can grow forever. The paradoxical pursuit of infinite growth on a finite planet has real-world consequences: from climate change to increasing income inequality to stagnant and declining quality of life for most of us to the ongoing mass extinction of species not deemed economically useful to us, but whose loss simplifies ecosystems to the point of collapse. If these trends continue, we will face very difficult times ecologically and socio-politically. One alternative to infinite-planet economic theory is Ecological Economics, which can be described as economics as if the laws of thermodynamics are true and apply to us. Alone among disciplines with aspiration to analytic rigor, the field of economics has remained unaffected by the thermodynamic revolution that transformed the fields of biology, chemistry, physics, even history in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This failure to take physical law into account is one great source of our society's environmental (and social, and political) problems. Ecological economics thus represents the continuation of the thermodynamic revolution begun in the 1880s. This course is designed to give you an appropriate grounding in the fundamental assumptions, the conceptual novelties, and the distinctive tools of analysis that comprise this emergent school of economic theory, while placing this theorizing in historical and ecological context. We'll pay particular attention to how the precepts and practice of Ecological Economics illuminate the largest challenge facing humans today, the necessity of developing an ecologically sustainable society, one that is sized to the limits of our finite planet.
Attributes:A&S IQSSCArchSSCArtSSCBUBAENS
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----2:30P-3:50PSchnuck Pav / 202 VanRiperNo final151511
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.

L82 EnSt 320Pathfinder: Environmental Modernism3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---4:00P-5:20PSchnuck Pav / 202 LouiNo final12110
Desc: Pathfinder students only may enroll.
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.

L82 EnSt 347Sustainable Cities3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---10:00A-11:20ATBAKrummenacherDec 17 2024 6:00PM - 8:00PM40390
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.

L82 EnSt 374Social Landscapes in Global View3.0 Units
Description:From the beginning of the human campaign, societies have socialized the spaces and places where they live. This socialization comes in many forms, including the generation of sacred natural places (e.g., Mt. Fuji) to the construction of planned urban settings where culture is writ large in overt and subtle contexts. Over the past two decades or so, anthropologists, archaeologists, and geographers have developed a wide body of research concerning these socially constructed and perceived settings -- commonly known as "landscapes". This course takes a tour through time and across the globe to trace the formation of diverse social landscapes, starting in prehistoric times and ending in modern times. We will cover various urban landscapes, rural landscapes, nomadic landscapes (and others) and the intersection of the natural environment, the built environments, and the symbolism that weaves them together. Chronologically, we will range from 3000 BCE to 2009 CE and we will cover all the continents. This course will also trace the intellectual history of the study of landscape as a social phenomenon, and will investigate the current methods used to recover and describe social landscapes around the world and through time. Join in situating your own social map alongside the most famous and the most obscure landscapes of the world and trace the global currents of your social landscape!
Attributes:A&S IQLCD, SSCArchSSCArtSSCBUBA, ISENSUCollCD
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L48 374  L48 574  L98 3742Frequency:Annually / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---10:00A-11:20ATBAFrachettiPaper/Project/TakeHome50506
Actions:Books

L82 EnSt 380Applications in GIS3.0 Units
Description:This introductory course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is designed to provide you with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to be an independent user of GIS. The course will use the latest version of ESRI ArcGIS. The course is taught using a combination of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on, interactive tutorials in the classroom. You will also explore the scientific literature to understand how GIS is being used by various disciplines to address spatial questions. The course takes a multidisciplinary approach that is focused on learning the tools of GIS versus working with data from a particular field. The goal is to establish a solid foundation you can use to address spatial questions that interest you, your mentor, or your employer. The first weeks of the course will provide a broad view of how you can display and query spatial data and produce map products. The remainder of the course will explore the power of GIS with a focus on applying spatial analytical tools to address questions and solve problems. As the semester develops, more tools will be added to your GIS toolbox so that you can complete a final independent project that integrates materials learned during the course with those spatial analyses that interest you the most. Students will have the choice of using a prepared final project, a provided data set, or designing an individualized final project using their own or other available data.
Attributes:A&S IQNSMArchESE, FV, NSMArtNSM
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:L18 380  L48 380Frequency:Every Semester / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----10:00A-11:20ARudolph / 308 GeorgeNo final17175
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.
02M-W----1:00P-2:20PRudolph / 308 GeorgeNo final17170
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.

L82 EnSt 405Sustainability Exchange: Community and University Practicums3.0 Units
Description:The Sustainability Exchange engages interdisciplinary teams of students to tackle real-world energy, environmental, and sustainability problems through an experiential form of education. Students participate in projects with on- or off-campus clients, guided by faculty advisors from across the University. Teams deliver to their clients an end-product that explores "wicked" problems requiring innovative methods and solutions. Past projects have included conducting greenhouse gas inventories for a community organization; developing a tool to screen University investments for sustainability parameters; developing a sustainability plan for a local nonprofit; addressing water savings initiatives for local breweries; and assessing the vulnerability of city sanitation systems. New projects and clients are introduced every semester. Team-based projects are complemented by seminars that explore communications, project management, data visualization, problem-solving strategies, and the environmental, social, and economic context of Saint Louis. The course is designed primarily for undergraduates, with preference given to seniors. Registration for this course is direct to the waitlist, and students are selected by application. The application can be found here . The deadline for the application is April 24th.
Attributes:A&S IQSSCArchSSCArtCPSC, SSCENS
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:I50 405  A46 405HFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---2:30P-3:50PJanuary Hall / 110 Williams, Krummenacher, Solberg, Knipp, VanRiper, BumpersNo final0023

L82 EnSt 407RESET: Renewable Energy, Decarbonization, and the Electric Grid3.0 Units
Description:RESET is an interdisciplinary course that explores the incredible potential of renewable energy, energy storage, and electrification to mitigate climate change. Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the complex dynamics that are driving rapid deployment of renewables and present both opportunities and challenges to decarbonization in the years ahead. Through the lenses of business, policy, and engineering, students in RESET will learn through classroom lectures from faculty, industry professionals, and policy-makers; group discussions; field trips to solar arrays and a landfill gas power plant; and a final team project where students serve as consultants to a local government, proposing an on-site solar strategy, local policy changes to support decarbonization, and more. By the end of the course, students will have an understanding of many large-scale issues influencing decarbonization, as well as the real-world factors that are necessary for designing, financing, and building new renewable energy projects. Why renewables and the grid? Decarbonizing the electric grid paired with electrifying sectors that currently run on fossil fuels - including transportation, heating, buildings, and manufacturing and construction - together have the potential to reduce more than 50% of global greenhouse gas emissions. The global energy transition, which was already well-underway, accelerated in 2022 due to a combination of countries' energy security concerns following Russia's invasion of Ukraine and expanding climate ambition resulting in new policies that support renewable energy, including the Inflation Reduction Act in the United States. The International Energy Agency's 2022 Renewables report found that "renewables are set to account for over 90% of global electricity expansion over the next five years, overtaking coal to become the largest source of global electricity by early 2025." Registration for this course is direct to the waitlist, and students are selected by application. The application can be found here . The deadline for the application is 5 PM on April 24th.
Attributes:A&S IQNSMArchNSMArtNSMBUSCI
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:Annually / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---1:00P-2:20PSchnuck Pav / 202 ValkoNo final0232
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.
Waits managed by dept.

L82 EnSt 452International Climate Negotiation Seminar4.0 Units
Description:This course is designed to prepare students to attend and observe annual meetings associated with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) as a delegate of Washington University. The course and meetings provide student delegates with a unique educational experience to observe the development of international climate policy through interdisciplinary negotiations and interactions inside the negotiating space. Students see the interaction between climate policy, science and technology as they identify and analyze policy decisions across the international climate regime. The COP 29 meeting will be held in Baku, Azerbaijan, from Monday, November 11, 2024 to Friday, November 22, 2024. While the number of students who can attend meetings is limited by the United Nations, we will do our best to have course participants attend one week of the COP. Course enrollment is limited. Indicate your interest by placing yourself on the waitlist and completing an application.The cost of meeting attendance is partially covered by the College of Arts & Sciences and need based support is available. More information on cost is included on the course FAQ page. Pre-requisite: junior standing. Contact the instructor with questions at martin@wustl.edu. Registration for this course is direct to the waitlist, and students are selected by application. The application can be found here . The deadline for the application is 5 PM on April 24th.
Attributes:A&S IQSSCArchSSCArtSSCENS
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:L97 4520  U85 5520Frequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01--W----4:00P-6:50PSchnuck Pav / 202 MartinDec 13 2024 6:00PM - 8:00PM0107
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.
Waits managed by dept.

L82 EnSt 4527IPCC: Governance, policy and science3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----1:00P-2:20PSchnuck Pav / 202 MartinDec 18 2024 1:00PM - 3:00PM2090
Actions:Books

L82 EnSt 483Introduction to Spatial Epidemiology3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01----F--10:00A-12:50PRudolph / 308 LianNo final2050
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.

L82 EnSt 4995Foundations of Research: Building a literature review3.0 Units
Description:The goal of this course is to introduce you to many of the skills that are required to generate, contextualize, and justify research. The final product of the course will be a literature review and tractable research question about a topic of your choice. One of the most important pieces of conducting research is to generate an interesting and important research question that is grounded in what we already know, contextualized by previous research, and justified by what gaps yet remain in our knowledge. Researchers craft and share this motivation in a literature review, contextualizes, justifies, and motivates the research question. Drafting a literature review is a critical and large part of the process, because working through writing of ideas is often how the ideas are shaped and refined, in large part because writing is thinking. In class we will cover a variety of concepts and skills that are useful in any discipline in terms of searching for the right kind of background information and data, evaluating types and quality of sources, reading and summarizing literature, constructing a logical and persuasive written argument, reference management, and data management and visualization. This course serves all students in the interdisciplinary environmental space, because the content and skills of this course apply to the literature review process across the range of humanities, social science, and natural science disciplines. We will touch on disciplinary conventions where they differ, but most of the content and skills are common and apply to all disciplines. Some students will go on to pursue a senior thesis research project while others may not, but all students will be able to transfer the skills you learn here into other course and capstone work, professional school and professional work going forward. Through reading, individual homework activities, and group discussion and class activities, you will learn and practice skills. Over the course of the semester, you will complete phased assignments that build up to a written literature review on a topic of your choice. Your course grade will be based on participation, homework, class activities, and assignments related to the literature review. This course is offered every semester. It is designed for third year students with a major or minor in Environmental Analysis/Environmental Studies. It is not required but is strongly recommended for any student who is considering senior thesis research in Environmental Analysis. Fourth-year and second-year Environmental Analysis/Environmental Studies students will be considered on a case-by case basis based on available seats.
Attributes:A&S IQSSCArchSSCArtSSCENS
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---11:30A-12:50PSchnuck Pav / 202 PardiniNo final1260
Actions:Books
Label

Home/Ident

A course may be either a “Home” course or an “Ident” course.

A “Home” course is a course that is created, maintained and “owned” by one academic department (aka the “Home” department). The “Home” department is primarily responsible for the decision making and logistical support for the course and instructor.

An “Ident” course is the exact same course as the “Home” (i.e. same instructor, same class time, etc), but is simply being offered to students through another department for purposes of registering under a different department and course number.

Students should, whenever possible, register for their courses under the department number toward which they intend to count the course. For example, an AFAS major should register for the course "Africa: Peoples and Cultures" under its Ident number, L90 306B, whereas an Anthropology major should register for the same course under its Home number, L48 306B.

Grade Options
C=Credit (letter grade)
P=Pass/Fail
A=Audit
U=Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
S=Special Audit
Q=ME Q (Medical School)

Please note: not all grade options assigned to a course are available to all students, based on prime school and/or division. Please contact the student support services area in your school or program with questions.