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29 courses found.
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (L82)  (Dept. Info)Arts & Sciences  (Policies)FL2019

L82 EnSt 101Earth's Future: Causes and Consequences of Global Climate Change3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---1:00P-2:30PTBAKidder, WilliamsDec 17 2019 1:00PM - 3:00PM040
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.
A-T-----4:00P-5:00PTBA[TBA]Default - none040
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.
B--W----4:00P-5:00PTBA[TBA]Default - none000
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.
C-T-----4:00P-5:00PTBA[TBA]Default - none000
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.
D--W----1:00P-2:00PTBA[TBA]Default - none000
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.
E----F--1:00P-2:00PTBA[TBA]Default - none000
Desc:This course is for first-year (non-transfer) students only. Students who are not first year students will be automatically unenrolled from this course.

L82 EnSt 105Sustainability in Business3.0 Units
Description:In today's complex business environment, organizations are constantly challenged to develop and execute innovative policies and processes that ensure profitable growth. Some leaders believe that the sole purpose of business is to maximize shareholder wealth and that profitability (or fiscal sustainability) is not compatible with environmental responsibility. In reality, ecological and economic performance need not-and should not-be mutually exclusive. Fortunately, the outmoded mindset of "profit-at-any-cost" is beginning to shift as organizations recognize the importance of adopting balanced business practices that promote economic prosperity, social equity, and environmental quality. Organizations that embed sustainability into their corporate strategies increase operational efficiency by using resources more responsibly and minimizing waste. In an increasingly crowded and competitive marketplace, sustainability has become a source of competitive advantage through which an organization can have a positive impact not only on the "bottom line" but also on the environment and society. In this course, we explore key concepts, debates, and issues driving sustainability in business. We will also look at various sustainability tools, principles, and frameworks that business can use to better understand the natural systems from which sustainability is derived and upon which all organisms and organizations rely to sustain their own existence.
Attributes:A&S IQSSCArchSSCArtSSCBUBAENS
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:Annually / History

L82 EnSt 210Undergraduate Teaching Assistant3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBATBAArvidsonNo final99900
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02TBATBALipelesNo final99900
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03TBATBALowryNo final99900
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04TBATBASchaalNo final99900
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05TBATBAStoneNo final99900
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06TBATBATurnerNo final99900
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07TBATBAKidderNo final99900
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08TBATBASmithNo final99900
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09TBATBACatalanoNo final99900
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10TBATBAJunNo final99900
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11TBATBAFikeNo final99900
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12TBATBAMartinNo final99900
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13TBATBAPardiniNo final99900
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14TBATBADeMatteoNo final99910
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15TBATBAManganNo final99900
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16TBATBAMyersNo final99900
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17TBATBABraudeNo final99900
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18TBATBAKrummenacherNo final99900
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19TBA(None) / ParksNo final99900
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20TBA(None) / WinstonNo final99900
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21TBA(None) / LouiNo final99900
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L82 EnSt 215Introduction to Environmental Humanities3.0 Units
Description:In this environmental humanities seminar we will consider texts illustrating how American citizens evolved in their perception, use, and expectations of the natural world during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, especially but not limited to the practice of agriculture. How did the mandatory short-term goals of health and economic security sought so eagerly by citizens, and supported by evolving technologies, foreshadow the unintended consequences of long-term environmental damage that would contribute to climate change, and how can we understand this using a critical and hopeful lens? Considering contemporary writings on our perception of "environmentalism" will help us nuance our analysis. Topics will include: agrarian democracy; settlement of the Great Plains by immigrant farmers; the Dust Bowl; fragmentation of the Sioux ecosystem. This cultural research will frame our visits to the Tyson Research Center, Washington University's field laboratory in west St. Louis County. Tyson's mission is to provide a living landscape for environmental research and education as a component of Washington University's International Center for Energy, Environment and Sustainability (InCEES). As a class we will meet with faculty researchers (from both science and the humanities) and hear about their work on ecosystem sustainability, that is, thinking long-term for human and environmental health. We will use texts such as: government reports, history, literature, environmental policy and autobiography. This course is for first-year students and sophomore students only.
Attributes:A&SFYSA&S IQHUMBUHUMENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:L61 215AFrequency:Annually / History

L82 EnSt 250One Health: Linking the Health of Humans, Animals, and the Environment3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---10:00A-11:30ATBAAdalsteinssonDec 17 2019 6:00PM - 8:00PM60130
Actions:Books

L82 EnSt 2950Introduction to Environmental Biology3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---1:00P-2:30PTBAPardiniNo final403814
Actions:Books

L82 EnSt 299Directed InternshipVar. Units (max = 3.0)
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBATBAArvidsonNo final99900
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02TBATBALipelesNo final99900
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03TBATBALowryNo final99900
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04TBATBASchaalNo final99900
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05TBATBAStoneNo final99900
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06TBATBATurnerNo final99900
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07TBATBAKidderNo final99900
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08TBATBASmith, Jennifer R.No final99900
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09TBATBACatalanoNo final99900
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10TBATBAJunNo final99900
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11TBATBAFikeNo final99900
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12TBATBAMartinNo final99900
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13TBATBAPardiniNo final99900
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14TBATBADeMatteoNo final99900
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15TBATBAManganNo final99900
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16TBATBAMyersNo final99900
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17TBATBABraudeNo final99900
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18TBATBAKrummenacherNo final99900
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19TBATBAParksNo final99900
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L82 EnSt 310Ecological Economics3.0 Units
Description:Our planet is finite but our economic theories and practices assume that our economy can grow forever. The paradoxical pursuit of infinite growth on a finite planet has real-world consequences: from climate change to increasing income inequality to stagnant and declining quality of life for most of us to the ongoing mass extinction of species that are not economically useful to us, but whose loss simplifies ecosystems to the point of collapse. If these trends continue we will face some very difficult times ecologically and socio-politically. One alternative to infinite-planet economic theory is Ecological Economics, which can be described as economics as if the laws of thermodynamics are true and apply to us. Alone among disciplines with any aspiration to analytic rigor, the field of economics has remained unaffected by the thermodynamic revolution that transformed such fields as biology, chemistry, physics, even history in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This failure to take physical law into account is one great source of our society's environmental (and social, and political) problems. Ecological economics thus represents the continuation of the thermodynamic revolution begun in the 1880s. This course is designed to give you an appropriate grounding in the fundamental assumptions, the conceptual novelties, and the distinctive tools of analysis that comprise this emergent school of economic theory, while placing this theorizing in historical (and ecological) context. We'll pay particular attention to how the precepts and practice of Ecological Economics illuminate the largest challenge facing humans today, the necessity of developing an ecologically sustainable society, one that is sized to the limits of our finite planet.
Attributes:A&S IQSSCArchSSCArtSSCBUBAENS
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----11:30A-1:00PTBAWebbDec 17 2019 10:30AM - 12:30PM3020
Actions:Books

L82 EnSt 364Field Methods for Environmental Science3.0 UnitsLab Required
Description:This course provides a broad survey of practical and applied methods for environmental field work for site assessments, ecological studies, conservation land management, habitat monitoring, and ecological restoration. A primary focus will be sources and techniques for obtaining and interpreting field data across a range of abiotic, organismal and system/community parameters, with emphasis on hands-on field experience providing students with direct knowledge highlighting the advantages and limitations of various methods. In the process, students will learn about multiple taxonomic and organismal groups and natural community types, and the relationships among these and the physical environment in functional natural systems. Course topics include theory and practice of methods for sampling biotic and abiotic resources, including vegetation, fauna, aquatic systems, stream geomorphology, and soils, as well as using these data for assessments, habitat monitoring, land management decisions, and developing ecological restorations. Students will gain familiarity with responding to issues driving applied environmental science and related fields today, including data quality, sampling design, field techniques, viability and threat analyses, and incorporating field data into multi-scale conservation planning and design work. The course consists of instructor presentations, guest lectures, readings and written response papers, student projects and presentations, classroom discussions, and extensive field exercises and hands-on training. Class logistics: one lecture (1.5 hours) and one lab (5 hours) per week, plus 2-3 all day Saturday field trips (see policy on absences for back-up plan regarding field trips).
Attributes:A&S IQNSMBUSCI
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CP Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01--W----2:30P-4:00PTBALaddDec 12 2019 6:00PM - 8:00PM1240
Actions:Books
A----F--12:00P-5:00PTBALaddSee instructor1240
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L82 EnSt 380Applications in GIS3.0 Units
Description:This introductory course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is designed to provide you with the knowledge, skills, and confidence to be an independent user of GIS. The course will use the latest version of ESRI ArcGIS. The course is taught using a combination of lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on, interactive tutorials in the classroom. You will also explore the scientific literature to understand how GIS is being used by various disciplines to address spatial questions. The course takes a multidisciplinary approach that is focused on learning the tools of GIS versus working with data from a particular field. The goal is to establish a solid foundation you can use to address spatial questions that interest you, your mentor, or your employee. The first weeks of the course will provide a broad view of how you can display and query spatial data and produce map products. The remainder of the course will explore the power of GIS with a focus on applying spatial analytical tools to address questions and solve problems. As the semester develops, more tools will be added to your GIS toolbox so that you can complete a final independent project that integrates materials learned during the course with those spatial analyses that interest you the most. Students will have the choice of using a prepared final project, a provided data set, or designing an individualized final project using their own or other available data.
Attributes:A&S IQNSMArchNSMArtNSM
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:L18 380Frequency:Every Semester / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----10:00A-11:30ARudolph / 308 DeMatteoNo final18150
02M-W----1:00P-2:30PRudolph / 308 DeMatteoNo final18170

L82 EnSt 390Independent StudyVar. Units (max = 6.0)
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBATBAArvidsonNo final99900
Actions:Books
02TBATBALipelesNo final600
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03TBATBALowryNo final600
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04TBATBASchaalNo final600
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05TBATBAStoneNo final600
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06TBATBATurnerNo final600
Actions:Books
07TBATBAKidderNo final600
Actions:Books
08TBATBASmith, Jennifer R.No final600
Actions:Books
09TBATBACatalanoNo final600
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10TBATBAJunNo final99900
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11TBATBAFikeNo final99900
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12TBATBAMartinNo final99900
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13TBATBAPardiniNo final99900
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14TBATBADeMatteoNo final99900
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15TBATBAManganNo final99900
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16TBATBAMyersNo final99900
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17TBATBABraudeNo final99900
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18TBATBAKrummenacherNo final99900
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19TBATBAParksNo final99900
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L82 EnSt 391Directed Research in Environmental StudiesVar. Units (max = 6.0)
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBATBAArvidsonNo final99900
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02TBATBALipelesNo final600
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03TBATBALowryNo final600
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04TBATBASchaalNo final600
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05TBATBAStoneNo final600
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06TBATBATurnerNo final600
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07TBATBAKidderNo final600
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08TBATBASmith, Jennifer R.No final600
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09TBATBACatalanoNo final600
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10TBATBAJunNo final99900
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11TBATBAFikeNo final99900
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12TBATBAMartinNo final99900
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13TBATBAPardiniNo final99900
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14TBATBADeMatteoNo final99900
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15TBATBAManganNo final99900
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16TBATBAMyersNo final99900
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17TBATBABraudeNo final99900
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18TBATBAKrummenacherNo final99900
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19TBATBAParksNo final99900
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L82 EnSt 392Directed Field Work in Environmental StudiesVar. Units (max = 6.0)
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBATBAArvidsonNo final99900
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02TBATBALipelesNo final600
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03TBATBALowryNo final600
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04TBATBASchaalNo final600
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05TBATBAStoneNo final600
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06TBATBATurnerNo final600
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07TBATBAKidderNo final600
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08TBATBASmith, Jennifer R.No final600
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09TBATBACatalanoNo final600
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10TBATBAJunNo final99900
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11TBATBAFikeNo final99900
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12TBATBAMartinNo final99900
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13TBATBAPardiniNo final99900
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14TBATBADeMatteoNo final99900
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15TBATBAManganNo final99900
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16TBATBAMyersNo final99900
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17TBATBABraudeNo final99900
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18TBATBAKrummenacherNo final99900
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19TBATBAParksNo final99900
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L82 EnSt 405Sustainability Exchange: Community and University Practicums3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---2:30P-4:00PJanuary Hall / 110 Langlois, Lowry, Braude, Johannes, Losos, Roth, Ehrhard, Krummenacher, Cosgrove Payne, SolankiDec 18 2019 3:30PM - 5:30PM0315

L82 EnSt 407RESET - Renewable, Energy Policy, Engineering and Business3.0 Units
Description:RESET will provide students an in-depth understanding of the policy, engineering, and business factors that are shaping the growing renewable energy industry, as well as the opportunities and challenges in the decades ahead for de-carbonizing the electric grid. From 2015 to 2017, the number of US states producing grid electricity from 20% or more renewable energy (excluding hydropower) increased from seven to eleven states. The IPCC's Fall 2018 Special Report on 1.5 degrees warming concluded that ~45% reductions in global emissions will be required by 2030 to limit warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. With this new science-based target in mind, how quickly can the US and the world accelerate the transition to renewable energy? What technical problems will need to be addressed? What is the current and future role of policy? What are the economic implications? . RESET is an interdisciplinary course comprised of classroom lectures from faculty and industry professionals; group discussions; field trips to solar, wind, and fossil fuel power plants; and a final applied team-based project to propose a new major solar photovoltaic project. RESET is structured to provide students an understanding of the large-scale issues influencing renewable energy deployment, as well as the real-world factors that are necessary for designing, financing, and building new wind and solar projects.
Attributes:A&S IQNSM
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:Annually / History

L82 EnSt 452International Climate Negotiation SeminarVar. Units (max = 6.0)
Description:This variable credit course (all students will register for 3 CREDITS) is designed to prepare students to attend and observe annual meetings associated with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) as a delegate of Washington University. The course and meetings provide student delegates with a unique educational experience to observe the development of international climate policy through interdisciplinary negotiations and interactions inside the negotiating space. Students see the interaction between climate policy, science and technology as they identify and analyze policy decisions across the international climate regime. The number of students who can attend meetings is limited by the United Nations. We will do our best to have course participants attend either the COP or Subsidiary Body meetings. Students attend one week. The COP 25 meeting will be held in Santiago, Chile from December 2 to December 13, 2019. The Subsidiary Body meetings will be in Bonn, Germany in June 2020. Enrollment is limited. Indicate your interest by placing yourself on the waitlist (registering for 3 credits) and completing an application. All students will be placed on the waitlist upon registration and students will be selected to enroll from the waitlist after all the applications are reviewed. The application will be open March 1 and will be available on the course website https://sites.wustl.edu/wustlcop/. Application review will begin April 12. Interviews will take place between April 16 and April 25, and enrollment decisions will be made by April 26. Participation in the course is possible without traveling to the meetings. The course is currently scheduled for T/Th 11:30 - 1:00. Contact the instructor with questions at martin@wustl.edu.
Attributes:A&S IQSSCENS
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:L97 4520Frequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---11:30A-1:00PTBAMartinDec 16 2019 1:00PM - 3:00PM15146
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Label

Home/Ident

A course may be either a “Home” course or an “Ident” course.

A “Home” course is a course that is created, maintained and “owned” by one academic department (aka the “Home” department). The “Home” department is primarily responsible for the decision making and logistical support for the course and instructor.

An “Ident” course is the exact same course as the “Home” (i.e. same instructor, same class time, etc), but is simply being offered to students through another department for purposes of registering under a different department and course number.

Students should, whenever possible, register for their courses under the department number toward which they intend to count the course. For example, an AFAS major should register for the course "Africa: Peoples and Cultures" under its Ident number, L90 306B, whereas an Anthropology major should register for the same course under its Home number, L48 306B.

Grade Options
C=Credit (letter grade)
P=Pass/Fail
A=Audit
U=Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
S=Special Audit
Q=ME Q (Medical School)

Please note: not all grade options assigned to a course are available to all students, based on prime school and/or division. Please contact the student support services area in your school or program with questions.