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14 courses found.
CHILDREN'S STUDIES (L66)  (Dept. Info)Arts & Sciences  (Policies)FL2024

L66 ChSt 300Interdisciplinary Introduction to Children's Studies3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----1:00P-2:20PTBARidolfiPaper/Project/TakeHome153015
Desc:This course has standard enrollment of 30, but the number of seats available in WebSTAC will stay at 15 during registration week in order to ensure space for juniors and sophomores. Please enroll to the waitlist. This course will be offered again in Spring 2025.
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Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.

L66 ChSt 3005Childrens Picture Books: Culture and Content3.0 Units
Description:Even in our world of apps and e-readers, paging through a picture book remains a beloved pastime for children. What has allowed the picture book to persist as a cultural object for over 300 years and what can it teach us about childhood? In this course, we will examine the history of the picture book, from the earliest illustrated educational texts to John Newbery's groundbreaking delights to the socially conscious picture books of the 21st century. We will use the picture book to trace important social and educational movements given its use as a tool to impart cultural values and knowledge. We will also examine important moments in picture book publishing history, most notably, the post-war Little Golden Books phenomenon. Authors and illustrators of study will include Randolph Caldecott, Beatrix Potter, Maurice Sendak, Ezra Jack Keats, Bruno Munari, Jerry Pinkney, Eric Carle, Tana Hoban, Leo and Diane Dillon, and Christian Robinson. Students will engage critically with both text and image, delving into the way images communicate meaning. The course will also contemplate important contemporary issues, most notably, race and representation in picture books and the rise of picture book bans. This course is well-suited for students interested in illustration, education, publishing, and cultural studies, and is appropriate for students pursuing the children's studies minor.
Attributes:A&S IQHUMENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:Annually / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---10:00A-11:20ATBARidolfiPaper/Project/TakeHome19194
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L66 ChSt 313BEducation, Childhood, Adolescence, and Society3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----1:00P-2:20PEads / 116 Sarah Lillo KangPaper/Project/TakeHome192110
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L66 ChSt 3140Sociolinguistics, Literacies, Schools, and Communities3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-----4:30P-7:20PMallinckrodt / 305 Angela Kelly, Jennifer RiesenmyPaper15151
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L66 ChSt 316WTopics in American Literature: Girls' Fiction3.0 Units
Description:Little Goody Two Shoes taught morality and the alphabet to the poor children of her village and eventually rode in a coach and six; Nancy Drew drove a blue roadster (later a convertible and still later a hybrid) while solving crimes and bringing justice to the town of River Heights. Between these two landmark characters lie the two and a half centuries of rich and diverse fiction for girls that will be at the center of this writing-intensive course. After grounding our studies by reading selected works from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, we will concentrate on twentieth-century productions, beginning with the surprisingly progressive serial fiction produced by the Stratemeyer Syndicate and others in the early 1900s. (Titles such as The Motor Girls, The Moving Picture Girls, and The Outdoor Girls advertise the series´ departure from domestic settings.) Throughout our study of both popular and classic texts, we will investigate the social, political and familial roles for girls that the texts imagine. Major genres will include mysteries, frontier fiction, career fiction, domestic fiction, school stories, and fantasy. Authors will include Newbery, Alcott, Montgomery, Wilder, Lindgren, L'Engle, and "Carolyn Keene." Writing Intensive. Satisfies the Twentieth Century and later requirement.
Attributes:A&S IQHUM, WIArchHUMArtHUMBUHUMENHUCollENL
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L14 316W  L77 3121  L98 3121Frequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---1:00P-2:20PTBAPawlNo final141524
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02-T-R---4:00P-5:20PTBAPawlNo final151516
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L66 ChSt 318Topics in American Literature: The Cultural History of the American Teenager3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---11:30A-12:50PTBAShipePaper/Project/TakeHome252510
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L66 ChSt 408Education and Psychology of Exceptional Children3.0 Units
Description:Learning, psychological, cognitive and social characteristics of exceptional children and youth from gifted to those with disabilities. Study child and adolescent developmental stages and the application to educational settings through data-based decision making using assessment and student data in a critical thinking, problem solving team approach. Current practices of educational strategies, interventions, and modifications to differentiate instruction for individual learning needs are emphasized. Plan lessons and activities that address student's prior experiences, multiple intelligences, strengths, and needs to positively impact learning. Learn specific strategies for classroom management, consultation and collaboration with families, colleagues, and administrators to meet individual needs within a culturally and demographically diverse classroom. Influences of legislation, criteria used to identify children, and awareness of supportive services are explored. Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000, 2000, or 3000-level Education course, graduate standing, or permission of instructor. Enrollment note: All students are enrolled onto the waitlist. Priority is given to Teacher/Deaf Education majors, prospective Teacher Education majors, and majors/minors in Educational Studies. Undergraduate students must enroll in Educ. 408 and graduate students must enroll in Educ. 6008.
Attributes:A&S IQSSCArchSSCArtSSCBUBAENS
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L12 408  L12 6008Frequency:Twice Each Year / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M------4:00P-6:50PSeigle / 304 Pam WashingtonProject0116
Desc:Waits managed by department

L66 ChSt 453BSociology of Education3.0 Units
Description:There are few institutions that nearly all Americans pass through, and schools are one of them; around fifty million students are enrolled in preK-12 schooling in the United States. As such, schools are an institution deserving of rigorous scrutiny and careful interrogation. But in studying K- 12 schools, we are in fact attending to a multitude of things - competing visions of and purposes for schools, and disparate experiences of accessing and navigating education that are widely divergent along axes of inequality. In this course, which will be conducted as a discussion-based seminar, we will engage with texts examining the enterprise of education from varied vantage points, but always through a sociological lens. We'll discuss the varied purposes theorists and practitioners envision for schools, and the extent to which schools live up to those ideals. We'll talk at length about how schools are a microcosm of many of the inequalities we see in the broader society, looking at issues of race, class, gender, and place. By taking a sociological lens to studying education, we'll learn a language and facility for rooting discussion of issues in education in theoretical grounding and empirical evidence. In so doing, students will develop the capacity to more critically assess scholarly research and public discourses on education, as well as their own experiences. Prerequisite: Completion of any 1000, 2000, or 3000-level Education course, graduate standing, or permission of instructor. Enrollment note: All students are enrolled onto the waitlist. Priority is given to Department of Education majors, minors, and graduate students. Undergraduate students must enroll in Educ. 453B and graduate students must enroll in Educ. 5530
Attributes:A&S IQSC, SD, SSCArchSSCArtSSCBUBA, ETHENS
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:L12 453B  L12 5530  L18 453  L40 4750  L40 5530  L98 453Frequency:Every Semester / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01--W----2:30P-5:20PTBANadirah Farah FoleyPaper0135
Desc:Waits managed by department

L66 ChSt 461BConstruction and Experience of Black Adolescence3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01--W----3:00P-5:50PTBANichols LodatoPaper/Project/TakeHome15153
Desc:For AFAS Majors, this course counts as Area Requirement 2.
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Label

Home/Ident

A course may be either a “Home” course or an “Ident” course.

A “Home” course is a course that is created, maintained and “owned” by one academic department (aka the “Home” department). The “Home” department is primarily responsible for the decision making and logistical support for the course and instructor.

An “Ident” course is the exact same course as the “Home” (i.e. same instructor, same class time, etc), but is simply being offered to students through another department for purposes of registering under a different department and course number.

Students should, whenever possible, register for their courses under the department number toward which they intend to count the course. For example, an AFAS major should register for the course "Africa: Peoples and Cultures" under its Ident number, L90 306B, whereas an Anthropology major should register for the same course under its Home number, L48 306B.

Grade Options
C=Credit (letter grade)
P=Pass/Fail
A=Audit
U=Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
S=Special Audit
Q=ME Q (Medical School)

Please note: not all grade options assigned to a course are available to all students, based on prime school and/or division. Please contact the student support services area in your school or program with questions.