WUSTL Course Listings Login with WUSTL Key
Search Results: Help Display: Open + Closed     Just Open     Just Closed View: Regular     Condensed     Expanded
18 courses found.
FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES (L53)  (Dept. Info)Arts & Sciences  (Policies)SP2021

L53 Film 220Introduction to Film Studies3.0 UnitsLab Required
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----1:00P-1:50PTBABurnettMay 13 2021 1:00PM - 3:00PM14900
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021
A--W----2:00P-2:50PTBA[TBA]No Final2200
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021
B--W----2:00P-2:50PTBA[TBA]No Final2100
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021
C--W----2:00P-2:50PTBA[TBA]No Final2100
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021
D--W----2:00P-2:50PTBA[TBA]No Final2100
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021
E--W----2:00P-2:50PTBA[TBA]No Final2100
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021
F----F--1:00P-1:50PTBA[TBA]No Final2200
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021
G----F--1:00P-1:50PTBA[TBA]No Final2100
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021

L53 Film 225Making Movies3.0 Units

L53 Film 320British Cinema: A History3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---10:00A-11:20ATBAStudlarMay 12 2021 6:00PM - 8:00PM2200
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021

L53 Film 330History of American Cinema3.0 Units
Description:This course will survey the economic, cultural, technological, and political contexts that have shaped the history of American cinema as art and commerce, from its origins in the mass culture of the 19th century to its centrality to the global multimedia environment of the 21st. In addition to examining the historical factors that allowed Hollywood to become the dominant global force in the making and mass marketing of movies, we will explore the continuing vitality of independent and experimental filmmaking, shining the spotlight on historically marginalized voices. Some of the topics covered will include the star system, the transition from silents to sound, self-regulation and the ratings system, filmmaking in wartime, women in and out of the industry, the Hollywood Renaissance of the 1970s, African American cinema, blockbusters and spectacle, queer cinema, and Pixar as contemporary franchise. In addition, we will see films by some of the most famous directors in American film history -- as well as some of the most unjustly overlooked. By the end of this course, you will have a detailed knowledge of the history of American cinema, the individuals and institutional processes that have shaped it, the economic, technological, and political forces that have transformed it, and the contemporary debates about its future. Priority given to majors and minors. REQUIRED SCREENING: Tuesdays @ 7 pm.
Attributes:A&S IQHUMArchHUMArtCPSC, HUMBUHUMENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CP Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:L98 3301Frequency:Annually / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----11:30A-12:50PTBAPowersMay 12 2021 10:30AM - 12:30PM000
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021

L53 Film 352Introduction to Screenwriting3.0 Units

L53 Film 353Writing Episodic Television3.0 Units

L53 Film 429Mass Culture and Modern Media: Fantasylands: Cinema, Spectatorship, and the Spatial Imagination3.0 Units
Description:This semester, our seminar examines cinema's relationship to urbanism, modern life, and amusement culture in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. This exploration is meant to facilitate a broader understanding of cinema by situating the medium in relation to the new forms of spatiality, temporality, and mobility that were consonant with "modernity." In particular, we will focus on commercial entertainments and spaces that produced stunning artificial environments, exotic virtual voyages, and a thrilling sense of bodily disorientation, while contributing to the formation of specific publics. By considering cinema's historical relation to these entertainments and locales, we can better understand cinema's connections to industrial capitalism, urbanization, consumer culture, aesthetic modernism, colonialism, and other kinds of distancespanning media and technology. Along the way, we will encounter a variety of modern spaces, places, and forms of transit. These include: the shopping arcade, the railway journey, the amusement park, the world's fair, the glass house, the studio city, the circular panorama, the slum, the department store, and the expedition. In the process, students will be introduced to relevant theories of space and place, urbanism, modern media, consumerism, and mass culture. For graduate students and advanced undergraduate students, with the permission of the instructor. No other prerequisites. REQUIRED SCREENING: Tuesdays @ 7pm
Attributes:A&S IQHUMArtCPSCBUHUMENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:Every 2-3 Years / History

L53 Film 458Major Film Directors: Spike Lee3.0 Units
Description:This course will examine the films and television work of Spike Lee and explore his career as master director whose output over the course of over thirty years forms a major intervention in the politics of racial representation on screen and off. The class will embrace a number of methodologies to examine Lee's career. Guided by theoretical as well as critical and historical readings, we will attempt to parse the various aesthetic and narrative means Lee has used to interrogate racism and how his screen work has represented the troubling intersection of race, class, gender, and justice in the U.S. while foregrounding African-American experience and thought in groundbreaking ways. We will have fourteen screenings that range from his debut feature film, She's Gotta Have It (1986) through BlacKkKlansman (2018) and counterpoint his feature films with his nonfiction work like 4 Little Girls and When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts. Along the way, we will explore his originality that often defies established categories of/in filmmaking, not only in terms of genre, but also in complicating notions of independent vs. studio, NY vs. Hollywood, comedy vs. drama, and explore too how Spike Lee has inspired, influenced, and sponsored other filmmakers. REQUIRED SCREENING: Wednesday's @ 7pm
Attributes:A&S IQHUMArchHUMArtHUMBUHUMENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:L98 4581Frequency:Every 2-3 Years / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---1:00P-2:20PTBAFleuryMay 12 2021 1:00PM - 3:00PM2500
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021

L53 Film 478Transmedia Franchises3.0 Units
Description:This course is an interdisciplinary seminar addressing the history, business, and cultural reception of media franchises. As the foundation of the course, we will distinguish between transmedia (i.e., expanding upon a single narrative across media) and multimedia (i.e., retelling the same narrative across media). Based on this distinction, we will analyze how artists, organizations, and audiences have adopted these storytelling strategies in the United States and around the world. Our analysis will be grounded in a series of critical readings taken from film studies, media studies, cultural studies, and adaptation studies. These methodologies and perspectives will guide discussions around questions such as: How have dominant approaches to franchise storytelling-including adaptation, expansion, and remixing-developed over time? How do these approaches compare across national cultural industries? How do different technologies affect the production and reception of transmedia franchises? What determines authorship in networked franchise production? To what extent do audiences shape the development of transmedia franchises? We will approach these questions and others through case studies of franchises across cinema, literature, comic books, television, and video games. Films screened will include The Avengers, Black Panther, The Matrix, Star Wars, and The Wiz, among others. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. REQUIRED SCREENING: Mondays @ 7pm.
Attributes:A&S IQHUMArchHUMArtHUM
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:Every 2-3 Years / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----1:00P-2:20PTBAFleurySee Instructor1500
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021
Actions:Books

L53 Film 479Identity and Culture in the Digital Age - A Seminar in Interdisciplinary Approaches to Culture & Fil3.0 Units
Description:We have become intimately and persistently intertwined with digital media. So many of our experiences and interactions, such as friendship, dating, and work, are mediated through these technologies. The ubiquity of digital media comes with major changes in the way we make sense of our identities, relationships, and communities. This course is an interdisciplinary seminar addressing the relationship between developments in digital media and changing conceptions of self and society. We will approach this topic by engaging with scholarship in film and media studies, as well as perspectives from related fields like software studies, critical algorithm studies, and histories of science and technology. The course will analyze issues such as the intersection of gender, race, and sexuality with technological development and will critique and evaluate different theories of digital selfhood such as the cyborg or the posthuman. We will ask such questions as: Who are we when we interact with and through digital devices? What pleasures and fantasies drive our digital engagements? How do digital media shape our labor in addition to our leisure? How do pre-existing cultural understandings of race, gender, and sexuality influence digital culture? By surveying digital media and computers, as well as their representations in film and television, we will explore how digital media help us imagine and perform alternative experiences of self, embodiment, and sociality both on and offline. REQUIRED Weekly or biweekly screenings or hands-on media labs on Monday @ 4pm
Attributes:A&S IQHUMArchHUMArtHUMBUHUMENH
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CP Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:Every 2-3 Years / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01M-W----11:30A-12:50PTBAHiluMay 12 2021 10:30AM - 12:30PM1500
REG-DelayStart: 1/25/2021   End: 5/13/2021
Actions:Books
Label

Home/Ident

A course may be either a “Home” course or an “Ident” course.

A “Home” course is a course that is created, maintained and “owned” by one academic department (aka the “Home” department). The “Home” department is primarily responsible for the decision making and logistical support for the course and instructor.

An “Ident” course is the exact same course as the “Home” (i.e. same instructor, same class time, etc), but is simply being offered to students through another department for purposes of registering under a different department and course number.

Students should, whenever possible, register for their courses under the department number toward which they intend to count the course. For example, an AFAS major should register for the course "Africa: Peoples and Cultures" under its Ident number, L90 306B, whereas an Anthropology major should register for the same course under its Home number, L48 306B.

Grade Options
C=Credit (letter grade)
P=Pass/Fail
A=Audit
U=Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
S=Special Audit
Q=ME Q (Medical School)

Please note: not all grade options assigned to a course are available to all students, based on prime school and/or division. Please contact the student support services area in your school or program with questions.