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37 courses found.
ARCHITECTURE (A46)  (Dept. Info)Prev NextArchitecture  (Policies)FL2024

A46 ARCH 307XCommunity Building3.0 Units
Description:This course looks at the intersection of the built fabric and the social fabric. Using St. Louis as the starting point, this course takes students out of the classroom and into a variety of neighborhoods -- old, new, affluent, poor -- to look at the built environment in a variety of contexts and through a variety of lenses. Almost every week for the first half of the semester, students visit a different area of the city, with each trip highlighting some theme or issue related to the built environment. These include topics such as architecture, planning, American history, investment and disinvestment, community character and values, race, transportation, immigrant communities, and future visions. Running parallel to this, students will be involved in an ongoing relationship with one particular struggling neighborhood, in which students will attend community meetings and get to know and become involved with the people of the community in a variety of ways. Students learn to look below the surface and beyond the single obvious story for multiple stories to discover complexity, contradictions and paradoxes. They also come to consider the complex ways in which architecture and the built environment can affect or be affected by a host of other disciplines. College of Architecture and College of Art sophomores, juniors, and seniors have priority. Students will add themselves to the wait list and will be administratively enrolled in the course. This course fulfills the Sam Fox Commons requirement.
Attributes:ArchSEPArtCPSC
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History

A46 ARCH 316FRe-Discover the Child3.0 Units
Description:Open to all levels of undergraduate and graduate students from Arts & Sciences, Architecture, Art, Business, Engineering, and Social Work. It is said that at this time in history, the entire country must commit to improving the possibilities of education. We must work to lift underserved people; we must expand the range of abilities for those caught in only one kind of training; and we must each learn to be creative thinkers, contributing our abilities to many sectors of our society. In this course, we will expand our views about learning by experimenting with the creative process of lateral thinking. We will learn about learning by meeting with some brilliant people at the university and in the St. Louis community who are making exceptional contributions to various scholarly and professional fields, and within civic engagement. We will also learn about learning by working in teams to develop an exciting curriculum (based upon the knowledge and passion WU students bring from their academic studies and range of interests) for elementary school students from economically disadvantaged urban families. Each week of the semester, we will learn about learning by giving 2-D and 3-D hands-on problem-solving workshops, once a week for one hour each week, for elementary school-age students. You and your WU teammate will implement the workshops you create. In this course, we celebrate the choices of studies we each pursue, and we expand our experience in learning from each other's knowledge bases and learning from each person's particular creativity in problem-solving. Course fee applies to mandatory background check and is not refundable.
Attributes:ArtCPSC
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:$45.00
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---1:00P-2:20PTBALorberbaumFinal Critique202010
Actions:Books

A46 ARCH 323AArchitectural Representation I (M.Arch 3)3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01----F--
M------
8:30A-11:20A
8:30A-11:20A
TBA
TBA
[TBA]See instructor000

A46 ARCH 364CProjective Excavation: Drawing out the Untold History of St. Louiss Chinatown1.5 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01--W----8:30A-11:20AWeil / 230 MurphyFinal Critique994
ShortStart: 8/28/2024   End: 10/9/2024
Actions:Books

A46 ARCH 3752Impossible Collaborations: Architecture and Machine Learning (Florence)1.5 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01TBA(None) / MhatreFinal Critique1700
02TBA(None) / SchumpFinal Critique1710

A46 ARCH 375MImpossible Collaborations: Architecture and Machine Learning1.5 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01--W----8:30A-11:20AWeil / 230 MhatreFinal Critique993
ShortStart: 10/16/2024   End: 12/4/2024
Actions:Books

A46 ARCH 3823Fifteenth & Sixteenth Century Florence, Rome & Venice: Rethinking Renaissance Visual Culture3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01---R---1:00P-3:50P(None) / Giraldi-HallerFinal Critique000
02-T-----9:00A-11:50A(None) / Giraldi-HallerFinal Critique000
03TBA(None) / Giraldi-HallerFinal Critique000

A46 ARCH 405HSustainability Exchange: Community and University Practicums3.0 Units
Description:The Sustainability Exchange engages interdisciplinary teams of students to tackle real-world energy, environmental, and sustainability problems through an experiential form of education. Students participate in projects with on- or off-campus clients, guided by faculty advisors from across the University. Teams deliver to their clients an end-product that explores "wicked" problems requiring innovative methods and solutions. Past projects have included conducting greenhouse gas inventories for a community organization; developing a tool to screen University investments for sustainability parameters; developing a sustainability plan for a local nonprofit; addressing water savings initiatives for local breweries; and assessing the vulnerability of city sanitation systems. New projects and clients are introduced every semester. Team-based projects are complemented by seminars that explore communications, project management, data visualization, problem-solving strategies, and the environmental, social, and economic context of Saint Louis. The course is designed primarily for undergraduates, with preference given to seniors. Registration for this course is direct to the waitlist, and students are selected by application. The application can be found here . The deadline for the application is April 24th.
Attributes:A&S IQSSCArchSSCArtCPSC, SSCENS
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:IdentSame As:I50 405  L82 405Frequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---2:30P-3:50PJanuary Hall / 110 Williams, Krummenacher, Solberg, Knipp, VanRiper, BumpersNo final0023

A46 ARCH 434JImmeasurably Small and Inconceivably Immense3.0 Units

A46 ARCH 438Environmental Systems I3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---8:30A-9:50AGivens / 116 YinSee instructor75100
Actions:BooksSyllabus
Syllabi are provided to students to support their course planning; refer to the syllabus for constraints on use.

A46 ARCH 445Building Systems3.0 Units
Description:Building Systems will examine the performance and properties of building materials, both traditional and new, through an analysis of assemblies and related systems. Investigations of wood, masonry, steel and concrete and the integration of relevant building systems will provide the fundamental structure for the course. All systems will be investigated relative to their architectural purpose, impact on the environment, relationship to culture/context, technical principles and will also consider manufacturing, construction, our profession and the society in which we practice. Moreover, the course will also examine the performance characteristics of contemporary enclosure technology and explore the impact these technologies are having on design thinking. Although we will focus primarily on the aforementioned topics, we will also identify and consider the impact of other parameters on design and performance such as: building codes, role of the profession, health and life safety, systems integration, sustainability and industry standards. The course strives to provide students with a sound familiarity and understanding of traditional building systems in wood, steel and concrete; as well as the skills necessary to represent these systems. The course also seeks to expose students to the material and poetic potential of these technologies related to the making of architectural environments.
Attributes:
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:C Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01----F--
M------
8:00A-9:50A
8:30A-9:50A
TBA
TBA
Moyano FernandezSee instructor100650
Actions:Books

A46 ARCH 457KTowards Common Ground3.0 Units
Description:Given that free market interests and extraction dominate contemporary urbanization, this class will explore socio-spatial configurations towards commoning that are surfacing within today's urban reality. With this in mind, you are invited to explore opportunities towards a common ground via the creation of a game. The debate on urban commons and commoning has grown exponentially in the twenty-first century. We are confronted with a significant amount of literature on commons, commoning, and the common, while the contemporary urban world is dominated by socio-economic disparities, privatization, inadequate resource distribution, and excessive resource extraction. As these forces and challenges unfold, the urge of urban inhabitants to collectively come together is on the rise. We generally see commoning as a base for collaboration and solidarity. Commoning, however, is a complex process as it relates to sharing knowledge and resources, and with regard to conflict and power struggles. Commoning in this context is an act of collective self-regulation and of self-awareness, as the sharing of resources, knowledge, and power create constantly changing rules for commoning and Commoners alike. As the philosopher Jacques Rancière reminds us, flourishing processes of commoning need both narrators and translators. Together, they enable commoning; they help facilitate the connection between people to enable new spatial configurations and stories to unfold. This course organized through two main principal agendas that are intertwined with one another -(re)search analysis and the development of a game revolving around the idea of commoning. The final product of this course will conclude with a play/presentation of the game you develop.
Attributes:ArchGAMUD, GAUI, SEP, UI
Instruction Type:Classroom instruction Grade Options:CPA Fees:
Course Type:HomeSame As:N/AFrequency:None / History
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01--W----8:30A-11:20AWeil / 330 KempfFinal Critique992
Actions:Books

A46 ARCH 490AExplore & Contribute: Collaboration between Washington University & Henry Elementary School3.0 Units
SecDays       TimeBuilding / RoomInstructorFinal ExamSeatsEnrollWaits
01-T-R---11:30A-12:50PTBALorberbaumFinal Critique20206
Actions:Books
 
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (A48)  (Dept. Info)Prev NextArchitecture  (Policies)FL2024
Label

Home/Ident

A course may be either a “Home” course or an “Ident” course.

A “Home” course is a course that is created, maintained and “owned” by one academic department (aka the “Home” department). The “Home” department is primarily responsible for the decision making and logistical support for the course and instructor.

An “Ident” course is the exact same course as the “Home” (i.e. same instructor, same class time, etc), but is simply being offered to students through another department for purposes of registering under a different department and course number.

Students should, whenever possible, register for their courses under the department number toward which they intend to count the course. For example, an AFAS major should register for the course "Africa: Peoples and Cultures" under its Ident number, L90 306B, whereas an Anthropology major should register for the same course under its Home number, L48 306B.

Grade Options
C=Credit (letter grade)
P=Pass/Fail
A=Audit
U=Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
S=Special Audit
Q=ME Q (Medical School)

Please note: not all grade options assigned to a course are available to all students, based on prime school and/or division. Please contact the student support services area in your school or program with questions.